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Farewell to Peter Tugwell, welcome to Andrea Tricco

      At the end of 2022, after 21 years at the helm, Peter Tugwell will complete his term of office as Co-Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology. Peter has provided sterling service to the journal, its readers and contributors, and his editorial colleagues since 2001. He has made an immense contribution to ensuring that the journal delivers its mission to present innovative research that is most likely to deliver improved health care.
      As one of the leading pioneers who initiated and developed the concept of clinical epidemiology as a core discipline for medicine [
      • Sackett D.L.
      • Haynes R.B.
      • Tugwell P.
      Clinical epidemiology: a basic science for clinical medicine.
      ], Peter has used this experience to greatly strengthen the Journal's performance. In particular, his longstanding commitment to evidence-based medicine (EBM), the methodology of systematic reviews, and the international Cochrane Collaboration, ensured that major innovative work in these fields found–to a much greater extent than previously—a natural place in JCE. Peter's vast expertise and incredible network have been of decisive importance for making this happen. Also, he was always keen to consider and advance specific innovations such as GRADE [
      • Guyatt G.H.
      • Oxman A.D.
      • Schünemann H.J.
      • Tugwell P.
      • Knottnerus A.
      GRADE guidelines: a new series of articles in the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology.
      ], the inclusion of nonrandomized studies in systematic reviews, and to stimulate and elaborate essential topics that might otherwise have been neglected in evidence synthesis, such as equity [
      • Tugwell P.
      • Robinson V.
      • Kristjansson E.
      The role of clinical epidemiology in health equity: Let's take action!.
      ].
      As an international leader in global health, Peter was inspiring and successful in promoting and increasing contributions from low- and middle-income countries in the Journal, e.g., by introducing the International Clinical Epidemiology Network (INCLEN) series [
      • Tugwell P.
      • Knottnerus J.A.
      • Idzerda L.
      Clinical epidemiology is alive and well in India.
      ]. This resulted in many excellent articles from talented new authors who could share their valuable work with the clinical epidemiological community worldwide. This also encouraged other researchers and authors from these countries to overcome the extra challenges and hurdles they still face.
      Rather than waiting passively for submissions, Peter's editorial approach was proactive. The starting point was to define the JCE's mission in early 2002, just after Peter and André began working together, and this has further developed since then. In successfully taking new initiatives in dialogue with potential authors, JCE has benefited greatly from Peter's breadth of expertise, his acute thinking, and his ability to provide informed opinions on a wide range of relevant topics. His approach was also highly inclusive in terms of bringing people together, and encouraging and coaching young and mid-career researchers to achieve their potential as scientists and authors.
      Peter's efforts to improving the Journal were focused on enhancing quality and relevance rather than increasing scores on notoriously biased indicators such as the Impact Factor. This approach, which as coeditors we supported, was crucial when initiating publications and new series in less well covered areas. Examples of this included applying the methodologies of qualitative [
      • Tugwell P.
      • Knottnerus J.A.
      • McGowan J.
      • Tricco A.C.
      Systematic review qualitative methods series reflect the increasing maturity in qualitative methods.
      ] and quasi-experimental research [
      • Tugwell P.
      • Knottnerus J.A.
      • McGowan J.
      • Tricco A.
      Big-5 quasi-experimental designs.
      ] in clinical epidemiology, evidence-based care in low- and middle-income countries, and finding ways to respond scientifically and methodologically to the COVID-19 crisis. Over the years of his tenure, it has been abundantly clear that this approach has been greatly valued by our scientific community, and the resulting publications proved to be widely read and well-cited.
      Kate Williamson, Senior Publisher at Elsevier Health and Medical Sciences, said, “We are immensely grateful for Peter's contributions to the Journal since stepping into the role in 2001. With his vast international network, Peter has been integral to building a strong Journal community with members spanning the globe and methodological expertise. Within this community, Peter fostered a collegial atmosphere for debate—both at JCE's in-person retreats and in the pages of the journal. We will miss Peter's keen editorial sense, where he combined his broad knowledge with a clear vision for what should end up in JCE's pages, and his palpable enthusiasm.”
      Peter, your vision, extensive knowledge, and cooperative and supportive attitude were highly inspiring for all of us in both editorial offices. We have learned a lot from your wise and always constructive feedback, invariably ending with the words “please feel free to ignore”. We also enjoyed your updates on the state of clinical epidemiology, and your evidence-informed dedication to dialogue and debate, especially during JCE's annual editorial retreats, which aimed to improve the journal and to provide opportunities to take full advantage of each other's expertise and creativity. It was a great privilege and pleasure to work with you. While you will be missed as figurehead of the journal to our audience, the team will take the liberty of calling on you, in your new status as Editor Emeritus, given your unique overview and almost inexhaustible arsenal of original and important ideas.
      We are delighted to be able to welcome Andrea Tricco into Peter's vacated role as coeditor. Andrea has worked as an Associate Editor on JCE, has developed an enviable reputation as a researcher and holds a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Knowledge Synthesis. She is a scientist and Director of the Knowledge Synthesis Team in the Knowledge Translation Program of the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, an Associate Professor at the University of Toronto in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health & Institute of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation, and a Co-Director and Adjunct Associate Professor of the Queen's Collaboration for Health Care Quality JBI (formerly Joanna Briggs Institute) Center of Excellence at Queen's University. Her research interests are related to responding to decision-makers (including policy-makers, healthcare providers, and patients) through knowledge synthesis. Her research focuses on advancing the science of knowledge synthesis and she is leading research projects related to rapid reviews, network meta-analysis, and scoping reviews. We know that she will bring energy and new ideas into the role that will build upon the extraordinary foundation of expertise and wisdom that Peter has exemplified.

      References

        • Sackett D.L.
        • Haynes R.B.
        • Tugwell P.
        Clinical epidemiology: a basic science for clinical medicine.
        First edition. Little, Brown and Co, Boston1985
        • Guyatt G.H.
        • Oxman A.D.
        • Schünemann H.J.
        • Tugwell P.
        • Knottnerus A.
        GRADE guidelines: a new series of articles in the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology.
        J Clin Epidemiol. 2011; 64: 380-382
        • Tugwell P.
        • Robinson V.
        • Kristjansson E.
        The role of clinical epidemiology in health equity: Let's take action!.
        J Clin Epidemiol. 2005 Aug; 58: 751-752
        • Tugwell P.
        • Knottnerus J.A.
        • Idzerda L.
        Clinical epidemiology is alive and well in India.
        J Clin Epidemiol. 2013; 66: 1-2
        • Tugwell P.
        • Knottnerus J.A.
        • McGowan J.
        • Tricco A.C.
        Systematic review qualitative methods series reflect the increasing maturity in qualitative methods.
        J Clin Epidemiol. 2018; 97: vii-viii
        • Tugwell P.
        • Knottnerus J.A.
        • McGowan J.
        • Tricco A.
        Big-5 quasi-experimental designs.
        J Clin Epidemiol. 2017; 89: 1-3