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Caution is needed when describing a study design as meta-epidemiological

  • Livia Puljak
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Center for Evidence-Based Medicine and Health Care, Catholic University of Croatia, Ilica 242, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia. Tel.: +385-21-557-807; fax: +385-21-557-811.
    Affiliations
    Center for Evidence-Based Medicine and Health Care, Catholic University of Croatia, Zagreb, Croatia
    Search for articles by this author
      In 2021 and 2022, the study design of multiple studies published in the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology was self-described by the authors as “meta-epidemiological” in the title and/or abstract [
      • Minozzi S.
      • Gonzalez-Lorenzo M.
      • Cinquini M.
      • Berardinelli D.
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      • Ciardullo S.
      • et al.
      Adherence of systematic reviews to Cochrane RoB2 guidance was frequently poor: a meta epidemiological study.
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      • Sánchez Medina C.M.
      • Maher C.G.
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      • Olivares Hernández A.E.
      • Valderrama Godínez V.
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      Almost one in five Physiotherapy trials excluded people due to lack of language proficiency: a meta-epidemiological study.
      ,
      • Kataoka Y.
      • Banno M.
      • Tsujimoto Y.
      • Ariie T.
      • Taito S.
      • Suzuki T.
      • et al.
      Retracted randomized controlled trials were cited and not corrected in systematic reviews and clinical practice guidelines.
      ,
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      • Tan A.
      • Caille A.
      • Yordanov Y.
      • Hajage D.
      • Tubach F.
      • et al.
      Meta-analyses frequently include old trials that are associated with a larger intervention effect: a meta-epidemiological study.
      ,
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      • Buxbom P.
      • Hrobjartsson A.
      • Harris I.A.
      • Brorson S.
      The methodological quality was low and conclusions discordant for meta-analyses comparing proximal humerus fracture treatments: a meta-epidemiological study.
      ,
      • Seehra J.
      • Bertl K.
      • Faggion Jr., C.M.
      • Pandis N.
      The certainty of the evidence in oral health has not improved according to GRADE: a meta-epidemiological study.
      ,
      • Tsvetanova A.
      • Sperrin M.
      • Peek N.
      • Buchan I.
      • Hyland S.
      • Martin G.P.
      Missing data was handled inconsistently in UK prediction models: a review of method used.
      ,
      • Khouri C.
      • Revol B.
      • Lepelley M.
      • Mouffak A.
      • Bernardeau C.
      • Salvo F.
      • et al.
      A meta-epidemiological study found lack of transparency and poor reporting of disproportionality analyses for signal detection in pharmacovigilance databases.
      ,
      • Honarmand K.
      • Penn J.
      • Agarwal A.
      • Siemieniuk R.
      • Brignardello-Petersen R.
      • Bartoszko J.J.
      • et al.
      Clinical trials in COVID-19 management & prevention: a meta-epidemiological study examining methodological quality.
      ,
      • Kataoka Y.
      • Anan K.
      • Taito S.
      • Tsujimoto Y.
      • Kurata Y.
      • Wada Y.
      • et al.
      Quality of clinical practice guidelines in Japan remains low: a cross-sectional meta-epidemiological study.
      ,
      • Mouffak A.
      • Lepelley M.
      • Revol B.
      • Bernardeau C.
      • Salvo F.
      • Pariente A.
      • et al.
      High prevalence of spin was found in pharmacovigilance studies using disproportionality analyses to detect safety signals: a meta-epidemiological study.
      ,
      • Mostazir M.
      • Taylor G.
      • Henley W.E.
      • Watkins E.R.
      • Taylor R.S.
      Per-Protocol analyses produced larger treatment effect sizes than intention to treat: a meta-epidemiological study.
      ,
      • Hayden J.A.
      • Ellis J.
      • Ogilvie R.
      • Boulos L.
      • Stanojevic S.
      Meta-epidemiological study of publication integrity, and quality of conduct and reporting of randomized trials included in a systematic review of low back pain.
      ].
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      References

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        Adherence of systematic reviews to Cochrane RoB2 guidance was frequently poor: a meta epidemiological study.
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        Almost one in five Physiotherapy trials excluded people due to lack of language proficiency: a meta-epidemiological study.
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        Meta-analyses frequently include old trials that are associated with a larger intervention effect: a meta-epidemiological study.
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