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Reconciling contrasting guideline recommendations on red and processed meat for health outcomes

  • RWM Vernooij
    Affiliations
    Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands

    Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • GH Guyatt
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence & Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
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  • D Zeraatkar
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence & Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

    Department of Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
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  • MA Han
    Affiliations
    Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju, Republic of Korea
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  • C Valli
    Affiliations
    Iberoamerican Cochrane Centre Barcelona, Biomedical Research Institute San Pau (IIB Sant Pau-CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain

    Department of Paediatrics, Obstetrics,Gynaecology and Preventive Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona,Barcelona, Spain
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  • R El Dib
    Affiliations
    Institute of Science and Technology, Universidade Estadual Paulista, São José dos Campos, São Paulo, Brazil
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  • P Alonso-Coello
    Affiliations
    Iberoamerican Cochrane Centre Barcelona, Biomedical Research Institute San Pau (IIB Sant Pau-CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain
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  • MM Bala
    Affiliations
    Chair of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Department of Hygiene and Dietetics, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland
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  • BC Johnston
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author.
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence & Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

    Departments of Nutrition, Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA
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      Over the last decade, multiple authoritative organizations have recommended limiting the consumption of unprocessed red meat and processed meat.

      Keywords

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      1. World Cancer Research Fund; American Institute for Cancer Research. Meat, fish and dairy products and the risk of cancer. Continuous Update Project Expert Report 2019. 2019. Accessed at: www.wcrf.org/dietandcancer on 05 July 2020.

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