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STREGA, STROBE, STARD, SQUIRE, MOOSE, PRISMA, GNOSIS, TREND, ORION, COREQ, QUOROM, REMARK… and CONSORT: for whom does the guideline toll?

Published:February 02, 2009DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclinepi.2008.12.003
      The first acronym in the title, STREGA (Strengthening the Reporting of Genetic Association studies), is the latest scion on the growing tree of publication guidelines, and is published in this issue of the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology and in several other journals [
      • Little J.
      • Higgins J.P.T.
      • Ioannidis J.P.A.
      • Moher D.
      • Gagnon F.
      • Von Elm E.
      • et al.
      STrengthening the REporting of Genetic Association studies (STREGA)-an extension of the STROBE Statement.
      ]. Most readers of this journal will recognize at least one of the acronyms—all are publication guidelines for diverse types of studies. The list is far from complete, and a cynic might be forgiven for thinking that there are now so many publication guidelines that nobody can keep track of, and that they will all sink quietly into oblivion. However, there is a watchdog, called EQUATOR (Enhancing the Quality and Transparency of Health Research), a network of guidelines that grew out of the work of several guideline groups [
      • Simera I.
      • Altman D.G.
      • Moher D.
      • Schulz K.F.
      • Hoey J.
      Guidelines for reporting health research: the EQUATOR network's survey of guideline authors.
      ]: it aims to monitor and propagate the use of guidelines, “to improve the quality of scientific publications by promoting transparent and accurate reporting of health research” [

      http://www.equator-network.org/, Accessed December 19, 2008.

      ].
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