Successful high-quality knowledge translation research: three case studies

  • Sumit R. Majumdar
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Tel.: 780-407-1399; fax: 780-407-3132.
    Affiliations
    Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, 2F1.24 Walter Mackenzie Health Sciences Centre, University of Alberta Hospital, 8440-112th Street, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2B7, Canada
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Published:November 05, 2009DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclinepi.2009.08.012
      Articles in this series have examined aspects of knowledge translation in detail, including various theoretical frameworks, types of interventions, implementation methods, issues related to measurement and evaluation of processes and outcomes of care, and the strengths and limitations of various study designs. This article draws upon what has come before and presents some “case studies” of high-quality and successful knowledge-to-action studies. The case studies (Kiefe et al. [
      • Kiefe C.I.
      • Allison J.J.
      • Williams O.D.
      • Person S.D.
      • Weaver M.T.
      • Weissman N.W.
      Improving quality improvement using achievable benchmarks for physician feedback: a randomized controlled trial.
      ], examining the use of achievable benchmarks with audit and feedback to improve multiple processes of care for patients with diabetes; Kucher et al. [
      • Kucher N.
      • Koo S.
      • Quiroz R.
      • Cooper J.M.
      • Paterno M.D.
      • Soukonnikov B.
      • et al.
      Electronic alerts to prevent venous thromboembolism among hospitalized patients.
      ], examining decision support and prompts for improving care of hospitalized patients at risk of thromboembolism; and Gonzales et al. [
      • Gonzales R.
      • Steiner J.F.
      • Lum A.
      • Barrett P.H.
      Decreasing antibiotic use in ambulatory practice: impact of a multidimensional intervention on the treatment of uncomplicated acute bronchitis in adults.
      ], looking at a multifaceted intervention to decrease antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections in the community) have in common that they addressed common and clinically important problems where the established evidence was already very strong and directed efforts at changing health professional patterns of practice.
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